Tag Archives: SOFR

ARRC Recommended Spread Adjustment Announced

The LIBOR transition plods onward.  Last Wednesday, the Alternative Reference Rates Committee (ARRC) announced its recommended spread adjustment methodology for cash products referencing LIBOR.  Regulators around the world have been clear: interim LIBOR replacement deadlines might slip, but LIBOR’s days are still numbered.  At the end of March, which feels like ten thousand years ago, … Continue Reading

2019 Golden Turkey Awards

As is our tradition here at Crunched Credit, each year, about this time, we award our Golden Turkey Awards.  Once again, I must say that we are utterly blessed with so many worthy candidates. The truly deserving have once again wrangled with vision and astounding persistence to earn a spot on our acclaimed list.  To … Continue Reading

Proposed Tax Rules on LIBOR Replacements Answer Some (But Not All) Questions

Last week, the U.S. Department of the Treasury released proposed rules providing tax guidance around various LIBOR replacement issues.  Long anticipated.  The defenestration of LIBOR will leave considerable broken glass in its wake.  Perhaps just so the tax professionals wouldn’t feel left out, the end of LIBOR will create a series of tax problems.  Very … Continue Reading

Quick Note: What Will the ARRC Recommend for the Spread Adjustment?

The LIBOR transition process is an affair of headache-inducing complexity.  Amidst the thousands of gallons of ink spilled on the subject, we thought it might be useful, from time to time, to give you some important information in  bite-sized servings (don’t worry, we will continue to publish lengthy, irreverent commentaries on the subject that our … Continue Reading

Killing LIBOR: A Victory for Irrational Rectitude

The US economy is about to pay the butcher’s bill for a massive disruption of worldwide financial markets resulting from the elimination of the London Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR.  And, we are doing this on purpose.  It seems the denizens of the heights of our international financial fabric felt they had to do this … Continue Reading
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